8 Comments

  1. Melissa
    December 29, 2017 @ 5:25 pm

    This was a very informative article on scuba tanks. I didn’t realize the difference in aluminum and steel tanks and that is great to know, I would have probably just bought the cheapest. I really like the option of getting your tanks painted, a nice jaws face would be awesome, hehe. Thanks for providing so many important details for beginners, I would love to see actually brands you recommend.

    Reply

    • Carl
      December 29, 2017 @ 10:39 pm

      Hi Melissa. Yes u can get some really awesome custom paint jobs on your tanks. I will be doing recommendations on brands really soon here so bookmark this site. Thanks for stopping b and I hope to see u in the water soon. 🙂

      Carl

      Reply

  2. Joseph
    January 4, 2018 @ 5:28 pm

    Very informative, Carl. I am 46 yrs old and I never knew that SCUBA was an acronym.lol I have an uncle who used to dive and I’ve always wondered, does the same equipment work in saltwater and freshwater?

    Reply

    • Carl
      January 4, 2018 @ 7:03 pm

      Hi Joseph. Yes, u use the same equipment for salt or fresh water. The only difference is it takes a little longer to clean your gear after a saltwater dive than a freshwater one, lol. You should think about giving it a try. Take care and thanks for stopping by and I hope to see you in the water soon.

      Carl

      Reply

  3. Stefan Vogt
    January 4, 2018 @ 5:49 pm

    Great information, I love snorkeling but am thinking of learning to scuba dive. Is it advisable to buy my own tank if I use it only two or three weeks a year or should I better rent one? I think I would go for a steel tank, an HP100 what do you think for starters?

    Reply

    • Carl
      January 4, 2018 @ 7:20 pm

      Hi Stefan. If you like snorkeling you are in for a treat when you scuba dive. If you are not going to dive a lot then I would just rent the gear. The only thing is that rentals are usually Alum 80’s. Steel tanks are the preferred tank to get through and will last you a very long time if you take care of them. So it would depend on your financial situation and how much you dive as to whether you buy your own tank or not. I prefer the steel tanks for the better buoyancy control u get with one. Alum 80’s are pretty buoyant and so u need more weight which u don’t want. The upside is Alum 80’s are cheap and u can pick one up for around $150. Well, I wish you well on your scuba diving journey and hope to see u in the water soon.

      Carl

      Reply

  4. Jacob
    January 4, 2018 @ 6:22 pm

    Wow, very cool. I didn’t know there was so much history behind the scuba tank, or that there were different kinds! Thanks for the info!

    Reply

    • Carl
      January 4, 2018 @ 7:30 pm

      Hi Jacob and thanks for stopping by. Yes, there is quite the variety of tanks, lol. I appreciate your visit and hope to see u soon here again.

      Carl

      Reply

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